November 2019 TBR: Readathons on Readathons!

Man oh man, I thought I was setting myself up for a busy reading month in October (see my TBR here and get ready for my wrap-up on Friday!)… but when setting up my November reading schedule, I realized that November is going to be even crazier! There are a whole bunch of challenges and readathons I want to participate in, so the most logical way for me to get to everything is to organize my month by weeks and have a different theme/challenge/readathon to focus on for that week. I’m super excited for all of these titles and really hoping I can keep my motivation up to finish all of them. I’d love some encouragement (or… commiseration? 😊) so if any of you are planning on participating in these readathons too, please let me know!!

Week One (Nov. 1-8): Goodreads Choice Award Thriller Nominees

The Goodreads Choice Awards are coming (I thought yesterday, but I guess I was wrong! But likely sometime in the next couple weeks), and I’d like to read all of the books nominated for the Mystery & Thriller category. I made some predictions earlier this week (see them here!) and I plan to spend the first week of November finishing off that list, as well as revising and reading the books that are ACTUALLY nominated once those come out. And, yes – this idea is heavily influenced by Booktuber Booksandlala – my queen. Can you blame me? The exact number of books I want to get to depends on how many of my predictions end up being correct… but my goal is somewhere between 3 and 5 books within the first 8 days of the month. Below are some that I’m thinking I have a good chance of getting to!

Before She Knew Him by Peter Swanson

Although I haven’t read from this author before, I’ve seen several good things about him and this book floating around the bookternet. I don’t know much about it, but it seems to be about a woman who starts to suspect her husband has something to do with an unsolved murder that happened in their town a couple of years ago.

Someone We Know by Shari Lapena

This latest release from Shari Lapena is, I believe, her 4th thriller, and so far I have read her first 2. Although neither have been 5 stars, I’m excited to give her another chance. I have heard that this book is about a small town in which everyone has secrets and wants to know everything about everyone else, but I don’t know much more of the plot than that!

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

This is a book that I certainly would not have planned to pick up had it not showed up in my research as a highly-rated, highly read thriller likely to be nominated for the GR Choice Awards. According to Goodreads, this book appears to follow two brothers trying to find out the truth about the death of their third brother.

Watching You by Lisa Jewell

Again, another book and author I likely would not have discovered if not for being nominated for GR awards in the past. Like Shari Lapena’s, this book also seems to follow a small-town neighborhood made up of nosey individuals trying to uncover everyone’s secrets.

Wilder Girls by Rory Power

This last one I’m not sure completely fits in the thriller category, as I’ve heard it more commonly described as a fantastical horror-type novel. But it has been extremely hyped, so nonetheless I’d love to read it even with the outside chance that it ends up as a nominee. I’m sure most people have heard of it, but the general plot seems to follow a group of young girls being held on an island as some kind of virus infects them and starts mutilating their bodies in horrific ways.

Week Two (Nov. 9-17): Tome Topple

This is a new-to-me readathon with the main focus being to read books with 500+ pages. The readathon is hosted by Booktuber Thoughts on Tomes – see her announcement video here for more details (including the actual dates of the readathon, which are the 9th to the 22nd!). I have several books on my owned TBR that fit this main goal, but I’d love to get to two or three within the nine days.

Thunderhead by Neal Schusterman

This is the second book in the wildly popular Arc of a Scythe series, a dystopian series about humans living in a futuristic world where death no longer occurs naturally. Death only comes to those who are selected by scythes themselves, highly-respected members of society who are trained to glean a certain number of people every year as a means of population control. I absolutely loved Book 1 of this series (Scythe) and am very excited to finally get to Book 2 (Thunderhead) and then eventually to Book 3 (The Toll), which is being released on November 5th!

Night Film by Marisha Pessl

This is a book that I have seen so many great reviews for yet know so little about that I don’t even want to know the basic plot before starting it. As far as I know, it is a thriller with some pretty dark/messed up topics, and I’m so excited to dive into it.

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

On a very different note, Carry On is a novel said to be sort of a retelling of Harry Potter in which Harry and Draco end up in a relationship. It sounds fun and creative and I’ve seen so much love for this book floating around that even though it’s out of my comfort zone a little, I’m excited to give it a try.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

You may be sensing a theme here, but this is another beloved book in the online community that I want to experience for myself. This historical fiction novel is set in Nazi Germany and follows a young girl who becomes, quite literally, a book thief, stealing books and exposing herself to worlds outside of her own, potentially offering hope in a time and place that is so hopeless for her in real life.

Week Three (Nov. 18-24): Buzzwordathon

And then comes one of my favorite readathons, Buzzwordathon. This is hosted by Booktuber BooksandLala (mentioning her twice in one post, clearly she is my fav!) – see her announcement video for this round of the readathon here! This readathon always features a buzzword (or a set of buzzwords) with the goal being to read as many books with that word/those words in the title as possible. This round, she has announced the set of buzzwords to be numbers – any form of any number in the title counts. Again, I have several books on my owned TBR that fit, but I think three to four is a reasonable number to strive to complete within the week.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

At the top of my Buzzwordathon priority list is this post-apocalyptic novel about a group of Hollywood actors trying to survive civilization’s collapse.

Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

This is (I believe) a contemporary novel about nine strangers who are at a health resort and whose lives (I’m assuming) start to interweave. I’ve only read one other book by Liane Moriarty, and I’ve seen mixed reviews about most of her works. So this could be a great experience or a very bad one. Either way, I’m excited to get it off my TBR list!

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

This classic novel is set during WWII and follows an American bomber during his experiences overseas trying to stay alive and ultimately make his way back home. I think I’ve tried reading this book before and found it hard to get through, so I’m hoping this time my experience is a little better and a little easier, since this book is so iconic in literature.

Million-Dollar Throw by Jim Lupica

This book actually belongs to my husband… but because it sits on my shelf, I have a weird thing about wanting to actually read it so that I can eventually have read all of our owned titles. I have no idea what it’s about (other than football, obviously) or if I’ll like it, but it is fairly short so I should be able to easily knock it out!

Week Four (Nov. 25-30): Sci Fi Month

Lastly, it was brought to my attention that November is Sci Fi Month as denoted by blogger OneMore.org. This is definitely self-explanatory, but the focus of this reading challenge is to read as many Science Fiction novels and consume as much Sci Fi content (in any format – tv shows, movies, podcasts, etc.) throughout the month. Although I’d love to dedicate the entire month to that theme, I feel most comfortable committing the last week of the month catching up on any Sci Fi books I still have on my shelves by the end of the month. I’d love to finish two within the five days I’ve allotted.

Artemis by Andy Weir

I just recently got my hands on this book and am super excited to get into it. I loved Andy Weir’s most popular book, The Martian, and because this book looks to be pretty similar in the space/sciency realm, I’m hoping I enjoy it just as much.

Illuminae by Jay Kristoff and Amie Kaufman

This book is super intriguing, not only because of its hype on the internet but also because of the format of the book itself. It looks to be made up of mixed media: computer files, emails/messages, and other miscellaneous text types to make up a very uniquely-told sci fi story.

Do You Dream of Terra-Two by Temi Oh

This book seems to be about a group of people leaving Earth for a new civilization and their experiences on the journey itself. I’ve heard that it’s suprisingly emotional, and I’m excited for that dynamic in a science fiction novel, as most tend to be more action-based than character-based.

And that is it for my (slightly crazy) November reading plans. For some, it might feel overly-structured, but for me it puts my mind at ease to have a little bit of a plan going in with some room for adjustment based on my mood any given week. Plus, this is possibly my last serious reading month of the year – in December I’m expecting to have a baby, and we all know that will seriously derail any reading plans I try to set for myself 😊

Again, I’d love to know who else is participating in any of these readathons or what your November reading plans are in general. Anyone else feel like they have a ton of books to cram in before the end of the year?


Buzzwordathon Wrap-Up | June 2019 | YOU

For my second round of Buzzwordathon, a readathon hosted by booktubers Booksandlala and Chanelletime, I went in with the much more (in my opinion) reasonable goal of 4 books in 7 days. [As opposed to my last, highly ambitious attempt of 7 books in 7 days – read about how that went here!]

For those not familiar with Buzzwordathon, it’s a week-long readathon with the goal of reading only books with a particular word in the title. This round’s buzzword was “you.” I chose 4 books on my owned TBR to tackle, and I’m happy to say that I completed all of them! Below are mini-reviews of the books I read and my thoughts on each of them – I’m very happy to say that not only was it a great week for my page count, but also for my enjoyment. No books lower than 3 stars, and two 5-stars!

Title: I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This
Author: Kate White
Genre: Female Nonfiction/Business Self-Help
Pages: 345
My Rating: 5 stars

Brief Summary: Kate White, the editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine, wrote this book to be a complete career guide for young women in any industry. It covers everything from how to apply for and land your first job, to how to impress your boss, to how to get promoted, to how to manage other people, all the way up to how to handle reaching the “big job” that you’ve spent your whole career striving for.

My Thoughts: I wrote on Goodreads that this is one of, if not THE, best career-focused self-help books I’ve ever read. Even though my industry is COMPLETELY different from the magazine/media industry, there were so many helpful tips throughout this book. It’s long enough to actually flush out all of her points (a big pet peeve of mine in self-help books is when they say a catchy, inspirational tip but then don’t follow up on how it’s actually useful), but moved quickly enough to cover a LOT of ground – pretty much an entire career. I didn’t ever find myself skimming or getting bored. Overall I’m just really happy to own and have read this book, and I can absolutely see myself reaching for it again as I reach different points in my career.

Title: The Five People You Meet in Heaven
Author: Mitch Albom
Genre: Contemporary
Pages: 196
My Rating: 3 stars

Brief Summary: This novel follows Eddie, an amusement park maintenance worker who suddenly reaches the end of his 83-year-old life. After death, he goes through a journey of meeting five people who have died before him and were integral in his life, whether he knew it at the time or not. He learns lessons about his life, his death, the world around him, and the impact his seemingly simple life left.

My Thoughts: This book is as heartwarming and inspirational as the title makes it seem. I think it is aimed at a younger audience, so I’m not surprised that I found the stories to be pretty simple and the life lessons a little cliché, but they are good life lessons nonetheless.

Title: Do You Realize?
Author: Kevin A. Kuhn
Genre: Science Fiction
Pages: 400
My Rating: 5 stars

Brief Summary: This book follows George, a middle-aged man who finds himself completely stuck in a rut in his life. His relationship with his wife is fine, his kids are fine, and his job is fine, but he is not fulfilled in any way. Suddenly his life is shifted when he meets a strange man on the subway offering to let him beta test an app on a new Apple watch that lets him travel to parallel universes and alternate realities of his life, effectively letting him time travel and relive key moments in his life. Around the same time, one of his family members is in an accident that has him wondering if he is living his life to the fullest, or if he could be doing more, a major question that shifts his entire mindset.

My Thoughts: This book – which I picked up on a complete whim on my Bookstore Scavenger Hunt – was the BEST surprise! I absolutely loved this story. It’s reminiscent in a way of Blake Crouch’s Dark Matter – so if you enjoyed that book, I think you would enjoy this one, too. But, it’s also very different. Both books explore parallel universes, but Dark Matter does it in a thriller-y way, while this book is much more contemporary in style. Not only did this book keep me entertained, it also made me think deeply about some of life’s biggest mysteries and left me feeling fulfilled and even inspired.

Title: How Lucky You Can Be
Author: Buster Olney
Genre: Sports Memoir
Pages: 215
My Rating: 3 stars

Brief Summary: Don Meyer was a well-renowned college basketball coach who was in a car accident right before his 2008 season. This book tells the story of his coaching life before and after the accident, trying to prove himself as an effective coach and then having to re-develop his entire coaching style after losing one of his legs.

My Thoughts: I think my reading experience would have been a lot better had I known who Don Meyer was before this book. [This book actually belongs to my husband, a big sports fan – I never would have picked it up if we didn’t already own it]. However, I can still appreciate a well-written book with heart-wrenching and heart-warming stories about an incredible coach and person. Very inspiring.


And with that, my second round of Buzzwordathon is over! Though 4 books in a week may not be the MOST impressive, I’m still really happy that I read and enjoyed four full books. Not only that, I’m left feeling refreshed (not burnt out) and ready to finish out June strong! How’s your June going?!


Buzzwordathon Wrap-Up | 7 Books in 7 Days | Did I Succeed?

Last week I attempted to read 7 books in 7 days and WOW… that was a lot of reading. I was participating in Buzzwordathon, a readathon hosted by Booktubers BooksandLala and ChelseaDolling Reads with the goal of reading as many books with the designated buzzword(s) in the titles as possible. This round’s words were Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How. I went for all of the words plus one extra – 7 books in total.

Did I succeed? Technically no.. but I was SO close. I’m still extremely happy with and proud of the reading I got done and even may have found my new favorite book…. 😊 Read on to find out what books I got through and my thoughts on each of them!

Title: The Woman Who Smashed Codes
Author: Jason Fagone
Genre: Historical Nonfiction
Pages: 341
My Rating: 4 stars

Brief Summary: This historical nonfiction/biography is about Elizebeth Friedman, a codebreaking expert who decoded enemy messages for the US throughout both World Wars. She and her husband, William Friedman, also a code breaker, essentially invented the modern science of cryptology and are now regarded as the “Adam and Eve” of the NSA. This book tells Elizebeth’s story from her very first job deciphering hidden messages within Shakespeare’s works through her most secretive work unmasking Nazi spies and playing a large part in winning WWII.

My Thoughts: Ummm, I want to be Elizebeth Friedman when I grow up. I find the subject of cryptology extremely interesting (The Imitation Game being one of my favorite movies), and Elizebeth’s intelligence, bravery, and humility is super inspiring. This book is pretty long and sometimes reads like a textbook, but the story is very interesting and I’m really glad I got to learn about Elizebeth’s life.

Title: What We Saw
Author: Aaron Hartzler
Genre: YA Mystery/Contemporary
Pages: 321
My Rating: 3 stars
Content Warnings: Rape and Sexual Assault

Brief Summary: We jump into this story the day after a big high-school party at which the main character, Kate, got so drunk that she had to be taken home early. While Kate is recovering from her hangover and piecing together the previous night’s events with her friends, it becomes clear that much more went down than Kate had originally thought. The next week, a charge of sexual assault is filed by one of Kate’s classmates against some of the school’s star basketball players, which causes uproar from the school and community. Kate then finds herself looking for answers – did it actually happen, and if so, who is responsible?

My Thoughts: This book is clearly important, as it covers a highly sensitive topic so relevant in today’s society. I think it does a great job of keeping the story and descriptions appropriate for young readers, while still being clear with its message. I found some parts of the writing repetitive (so. much. fist bumping.) and the ending was predictable, but I can definitely appreciate the book’s intent and would absolutely recommend it to a young adult audience.

Title: Where’d You Go, Bernadette
Author: Maria Semple
Genre: Contemporary
Pages: 347
My Rating: 4 stars

Brief Summary: Through a string of letters and emails, 15-year-old Bee is piecing together her mother, Bernadette’s, life from before she went missing. The fact that Bernadette is so mysterious and secretive with her identity has put a serious strain on her relationships with neighbors and other moms at Bee’s school. But would she really abandon Bee and her husband right before they’re supposed to leave for an Antarctic vacation? Bee’s determined to find out not only where her mother is, but what she’s seemingly been hiding from everyone in her life.

My Thoughts: First off, I love the format of this book, told primarily in emails and letters. It allows us to get a little glimpse into each the characters’ perspectives, without reading all of their thoughts – we only get to know the things they’re willing to reveal to put down on paper. I thought the storyline was great, fast-moving enough to stay interested in the mystery at hand but with enough detail to feel like we know the characters pretty intimately. I agree with all of the high praise I’ve seen about this book, and think it will make a great movie!

Title: Little Fires Everywhere
Author: Celeste Ng
Genre: Contemporary
Pages: 336
My Rating: 5 stars

Brief Summary: This story takes place almost exclusively within Shaker Heights, an affluent neighborhood with strict aesthetic guidelines and expectations of its residents to maintain a pristine image. We first meet the Richardson family, made up of 4 children in high school, a hard-working lawyer for a father, and a mother who is filled with a sense of pride and generosity by renting a nearby home to a struggling artist and her high-school aged daughter. The two families get to know each other quite well, but suddenly find themselves on two different sides of a custody battle between a Shaker Heights couple attempting to adopt a baby whose birth mother is putting up a fight. Everyone in the community seems to have a different opinion on what’s best for the baby, which proves to be a much more complex question than it appeared upon first glance.

My Thoughts: I think this might be my new favorite book. I loved it SO much. All of the characters were well-developed through extensive backstories (I think this is where some people might find the book to be slow, but I really enjoyed reading the backgrounds) and the plot connected with me deeply. It made me think hard about what I would do in the situation, who I would most likely side with, and how easily opinions can change once you know personally the people on both sides of the argument. Celeste Ng did a really nice job interweaving multiple story lines in a realistic and impactful way – and I already can’t wait to reread this story!

Title: When to Rob a Bank
Authors: Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
Genre:Nonfiction/Economics
Pages: 350
My Rating: 3 stars

Brief Summary: This book is actually a collection of blog posts taken from the Freakonomics blog, created by the authors who originally wrote the book Freakonomics. These blog posts speak on similar topics – interesting ways that economics shape our world and ways we can use that knowledge to our advantage.

My Thoughts: I had seen a lot of negative reviews on this book, perhaps because some of the blog posts are not politically correct or present an unpopular viewpoint. I actually really enjoyed it for that reason – it made me look and think differently about a number of issues I previously thought were pretty black-and-white. For example, it talks about why we shouldn’t necessarily be looking to eliminate all plastic packaging when it comes to food items, and in another post about the actual environmental effects of car emissions and whether walking short distances is as environmentally-friendly as we’ve been taught to believe. Other sections were purely entertaining, like a collection of 6-word mottos for America and the best aptonyms of all time, which are names that sound similar to the person’s profession (e.g. a funeral home director named Eikenberry (“I can bury”) or an insurance guy named Justin Case). Yes, there were a number of articles that I skimmed because I was disinterested and some that I did not agree with, but in my opinion the good outweighed the bad and made it worth the read.

Title: Why We Broke Up
Author: Daniel Handler
Genre: Contemporary
Pages: 354
My Rating: 2 stars

Brief Summary: This book is told as one long letter from high-school-aged Min to her now-ex-boyfriend Ed, detailing all of the reasons they – spoiler alert – broke up. She’s writing it to go along with a box of things she is returning to Ed, so each chapter highlights a different item and explains how it specifically contributed to their breakup.

My Thoughts: After reading this book, I have to wonder if I’m just not a fan of YA contemporaries. I found myself the whole time thinking “you should have broken up with him a long time ago because this guy is a complete d-bag.” I think the concept of this book is great, love the breakup letter accompanying the box full of returned stuff, and I really enjoyed the illustrations done by Maira Kalman. I just didn’t like the story or the characters, too much immaturity for me to feel like I could relate at all!

Title: How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking
Author: Jordan Ellenberg
Genre:Nonfiction/Mathematics
Pages: 437
My Rating: TBD!

Brief Summary: This book is described by Goodreads as the Freakonomics of math – aka how math is everywhere in the world and how by understanding it a bit better, we can understand trends and explanations for social, economic, and environmental activities all around us.

My Thoughts: Unfortunately, this is the one book I did not complete this week. I am about 300 pages in though, so I’ve gotten a decent feeling for it so far – and as an engineer I’m loving everything about this book. I loved math growing up, especially calculus because it really does explain so much of the world. This book is doing a really great job of taking those complex concepts and simplifying them so that even people who are not mathematically-minded can understand and appreciate how much the mathematical concepts are reflected in the real world. Waiting for the aha-moment that this book promises: how we can use this information not just to understand our world but to really shape our own lives and start to make different decisions because of it!

Other than finishing this last book, I think I’m a little burnt out from reading and probably will take the rest of March off. But I had a lot of fun creating this TBR for Buzzwordathon and definitely will be taking part in more readathons going forward!


Buzzwordathon Kickoff: Attempting 7 Books in 7 Days!

I’m so excited for this week!! Today marks the kickoff of Buzzwordathon, a readathon hosted by booktubers Booksandlala and Chelseadolling reads. The goal of the readathon is to read as many books with the selected buzzword (or in this case, buzzwords) in the title as possible within 7 days.

This round’s buzzwords are Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How. I’ve picked one book with each word in the title, plus one extra. I do have physical copies of each book, but I think I’ll end up supplementing with the audiobook formats if I start falling behind throughout the week!

See my picks below and let me know if you’ll be participating in this readathon – if so, what books are YOU planning to read?

The Woman Who Smashed Codes by Jason Fagone – a historical nonfiction about a woman who cracked enemy codes and played a meaningful part in WWII.

What We Saw by Aaron Hartzler – a thriller/mystery (I believe) about what happened at a crazy party.

Where‘d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple – a contemporary about a mother who suddenly goes missing.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng – a character-driven contemporary highlighting family dynamics and small-town politics.

When to Rob a Bank by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner – an economic nonfiction with insights and essays from the Freakonomics blog.

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler – an illustrated contemporary/romance about exactly what it says – why a couple broke up.

How Not to Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg – a nonfiction described as “the Freakonomics of math,” unveiling the secrets of math and the value in using them to your advantage.

Check back in on the 25th to see if I succeeded! Happy reading this week 🙂


March 2019 TBR

I’m typically not one to have a very strict TBR going into a new month – I can get easily sidetracked when it’s time to pick up the next book on the list, which causes unneccessary disappointment at the end of the month when I should be happy I read anything at all. THIS month, however, is different. I will be participating in my first ever readathon (Buzzwordathon hosted by booktubers Booksandlala and Chelseadolling, yay!) which has prompted me to do a little more pre-planning than usual. Plus I have a few other books outside of the readathon I want to get to, so my TBR for March is a whopping 10 books (a lot for me)! See the list below and wish me luck! 🙂

Readathon Books

If you’re not familiar with Buzzwordathon, the theme is to read books that have a particular word somewhere in their titles. This round, the word is actually 6 different words: Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How. I’m choosing to attempt to read at least one book for each of the words.

The Woman Who Smashed Codes by Jason Fagone – a historical nonfiction that tells the story of a woman and her husband who worked together cracking codes in WWII.

What We Saw by Aaron Hartzler – I believe this is a mystery/thriller, and I intentionally don’t know much about the plot. This has been recommended by Kayla (Lala) from Booksandlala!

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng – I also don’t know much about this book’s plot, despite the fact that it’s been a pretty popular book floating around my social medias. Genre is contemporary.

Where‘d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple – this is a bonus “where” book that I’m adding because of the upcoming movie. Whether I fit it in during the readathon week or not, I will be reading this soon! A contemporary/mystery about a mother who goes missing.

When to Rob a Bank by Steven D. Levitt – Levitt is the author of Freakonomics and Super Freakonomics, two very popular books that cover a variety of miscellaneous economic, statistical, and psychology topics, and I believe this book will be very similar.

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler – a contemporary that again comes very highly recommended by miss Booksandlala herself!

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg – as an engineer, I am ALL ABOUT mathematical thinking. And hey, I enjoy being right, too. I love the concept of this book and hope it lives up to the hype I’ve created in my own mind!

Non-Readathon Books

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls – I’m about halfway through this memoir that covers Jeannette’s tough childhood constantly on the run with her family battling hunger and homelessness. Should be a very quick one to finish up!

The Girl He Used to Know by Tracey Garvis Graves – my very first ARC!!!!! I was sent this book by the SheSpeaks program and St. Martins Press in return for an honest review, and I am so excited to give this book a try and offer my thoughts before it’s released on April 2nd. It’s a contemporary romance novel.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid – I have waited LONG ENOUGH to start this extremely popular and well-reviewed book and cannot wait to dive it. I truly don’t know much about the plot, which makes me even more excited to find out.

With that, I’d better get to reading 🙂 I hope you all have a great March planned – let me know what’s on your TBR if you have one, and if not, what book(s) you’re currently reading!